Archive for October 27th, 2022

Buying and Selling a Home: Budget 2022 Proposals

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The 2022 Federal Budget included several proposals that would significantly change the taxation environment when buying and selling a home. Broadly, the government proposed various incentives for first-time buyers and extended family units in addition to bright-line tests/restrictions for those purchasing homes for profit (e.g. home flippers). Taxpayers should consider how the changes will affect their intended purchases and sales. In some cases, it may be beneficial to expedite a purchase or sale, while in others, it may be prudent to delay. 

New possibilities and enhanced programs include the following: 

  • Home accessibility tax credit – The annual expense limit would be doubled to $20,000 such that the maximum non-refundable tax credit would be $3,000, proposed to be effective for 2022 and subsequent taxation years. This credit applies to enduring and integral home renovations in respect of a taxpayer, or a relative who is (or will be) living with the taxpayer, that is either a senior or eligible for the disability tax credit. The renovation must enable the individual to gain access to the home, be more mobile or functional in the home, or reduce the risk of harm within, or in gaining access to, the home. 
  • Home buyers’ tax credit – The amount would be doubled such that eligible first-time home buyers could access tax relief of $1,500, proposed to be effective for acquisitions of a qualifying home on or after January 1, 2022.  
  • Tax-free first home savings account – A new registered account would allow for tax-deductible contributions of up to $8,000 annually and up to $40,000 in total; withdrawals from the plan (including income earned in the plan) to purchase a first home would not be taxable. This initiative is expected to become available in 2023. 
  • Multigenerational home renovation tax credit – A new tax credit would provide relief on up to $50,000 of eligible expenses to construct a secondary suite for a senior or person with a disability to live with a relative. This initiative is expected to become available in 2023. 

New cautions and restrictions include the following: 

  • Residential property flipping rule – A new rule would be introduced to deem all gains arising from the disposition of a residential property (including rental property)that was owned for less than 12 months to be business income, other than any disposition for which an exception would apply (such as where a death or addition to the family necessitates a move). Sales on homes owned for 12 months or more would follow the traditional rules. This means that such sales could still be classified as fully taxable business income and not be eligible for the principal residence exemption. This measure would apply to residential properties sold on or after January 1, 2023.
  • Foreign buyer property banForeign commercial enterprises and people who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents would be prohibited from acquiring non-recreational residential property in Canada for two years. This would not apply to refugees and people authorized to come to Canada while fleeing international crises, certain international students on the path to permanent residency or individuals on work permits residing in Canada. 
  • GST/HST on assignment sales by individuals – All assignment sales in respect of newly constructed or substantially renovated residential housing would be taxable for GST/HST purposes. 

In addition to the above tax measures, Budget 2022 proposed to develop and implement a Home Buyers’ Bill of Rights and national plan to end blind bidding. This Bill of Rights could also include items such as ensuring a legal right to a home inspection and ensuring transparency on the history of sales prices on title searches. 

ACTION: Consider the expected timing of implementation for reach of these measures and the impacts on purchases or sales.

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